Auditions

DEATHTRAP AUDITIONS

July 24, 2018 from 6pm – 9pm

540 Wall Street, Auburn CA

The director has asked that those wishing to audition “prepare” the scenes noted. The extent of your “preparation” will be weighed as a measure of your characterization, familiarization with the script, earnestness in auditioning, dedication, memorizing dexterity and familiarity with the material. It is strongly recommended to arrive to the audition prepared and having read the entire script (available online). In addition, it will be important that you are at least familiar with the other audition scenes in which your character appears.

CHARACTERS:
Sidney Bruhl, a once successful playwright
Myra Bruhl, his wife
Clifford Anderson, a student of Sidney’s
Helga ten Dorp, a psychic
Porter Miligrim, Sidney’s attorney

AUDITION PAGES AND CHARACTER NAMES
Helga audition scene, prepare pages 39 and 40
Sidney audition scene, prepare both monologues on page 4
Myra audition scene, prepare pages 35 and 36
Clifford audition scene, prepare pages 45-48
Porter audition scene, prepare pages 58-60

Please download the Audition Form and bring to the audition with a head shot. Forms will also be available at the audition.

REHEARSAL INFORMATION
The play will be cast a week prior to the first rehearsal. This will be a time of study and memorization. Cast members will be expected to be off book on any particular scene after the second rehearsal thereof. Waiting until the scene is blocked may not afford enough time for memorization prior to the third rehearsal. If this is not something to which you can commit, please do not audition. Directing is an art form, just as is performing. The bulk of the director’s art comes after the piece has been memorized and performers are off book. Therefore, it would not be appropriate to drag out the memorization process longer than necessary. Scott Ewing, the director, directs in four parts. The first is characterization, which is done with script analysis and with homework in the period prior to rehearsal and directly after casting. The second is memorization and blocking. The third is the creation of bits and beats and flushing out of character and nuance. This is the part that makes a play great and is not possible with scripts in hand. The fourth is interacting with the technical elements. In this case this includes weapons, scenery, costumes, sound and lights. Depending on scheduling conflicts with the actual cast, the aim is to be off book for the entire show for a stumble through September 4th, four weeks after rehearsals begin in earnest. The show will be cast by Sunday, July 29. There will be a table read and assignment of homework July 31 that must be turned in by August 5th. Rehearsals will take place weeknights and some Sundays and the schedule will be created once the show is cast. Rehearsals begin Tuesday, August 7th. Performers will not be called to rehearse unless they are needed. The more prepared the performers, the fewer rehearsals we will need.

If this detailed and dedicated preparation and rehearsal period works for you, we would love for you to audition. We’re going to have a lot of fun and together create a work of which we can be proud.

July 24             Auditions 6-9
July 25             Callbacks 6-9
July 29             Casting complete
July 31             Table read and homework assigned
August 5          Homework turned in by email
August 7          Rehearsals begin. Performers to be off book by third rehearsal of a scene.
September 4    Off book stumble through with producers. Rehearsals continue off book.
September 30  Begin work with ALL props and costumes and sound.
October 7         Set complete. Rehearsals move to theater. Tech week begins.
October 11       Invited dress Rehearsal
October 12       Open
October 13       Run
October 14       Run
October 19-21  Run
October 25-26  Run
October 27       Closing show and all call for strike

ABOUT THE SHOW
Seemingly comfortably ensconced in his charming Connecticut home, Sidney Bruhl, a successful writer of Broadway thrillers, is struggling to overcome a “dry” spell which has resulted in a string of failures and a shortage of funds. A possible break in his fortunes occurs when he receives a script from a student in the seminar he has been conducting at a nearby college—a thriller which Sidney recognizes immediately as a potential Broadway hit. Sidney’s plan, which he devises with his wife’s help, is to offer collaboration to the student, an idea which the younger man quickly accepts. Thereafter suspense mounts steadily as the plot begins to twist and turn with devilish cleverness, and with such an abundance of thrills and laughter, that audiences will be held enthralled until the final, startling moments of the play.

If you would like to be added to our email list for future auditions, please visit our Contact Us section.

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